A moment’s pause

This was sent to me me by a friend and colleague, Glen McCoy As always from Glen, worth watching – particularly if you find yourself reflecting on why you’re doing what you’re doing…….

We are lucky to be here. Enjoy it.

Dependence, Independence, Interdependence and Permission

Most of us are brought up to be dependent – on other’s approval, on “experts”, and to needing permission.

In the industrial era, it made sense, hierarchies were effective means of command and control, and compliance meant the difference between earning a living, or not.

As technology and social structures changed, we moved towards greater independence, often with money at the heart of it. Lifelong employment disappeared, and with it notions of loyalty and duty towards an employer, to be replaced by independence  for those who had marketable skills, or independent means. It gave us a sort of lonely freedom – not being governed, but without the work community that often provides support and meaning.

The most successful are now moving beyond this to interdependence – retaining all the options of independence, but choosing communities and “tribes” of those they choose to share their work and lives with. I work with a lot of fast growing businesses, and this feature – an interdependence with colleagues and clients – is a very visible feature. It gives them purpose, adaptability, flexibility and huge capability and attractiveness.

Many established organisations, and most of government, has not yet understood this. They pay lip service to it without understanding its implications. A dangerous place to be complacent. Those centralised institutions, from Head Office to Westminster, are becoming less and less important to those with the talent to create the future.

Adam Lent has written an excellent blog on the RSA site, which examines what 21st Century organisations might look like. In my view, worth the five minutes it will take to read.

The future is arriving faster than you think, whether you’re ready or not.

It offers immense opportunity, but won’t ask permission.

Permission to Speak Sir?

There are interesting fault lines beginning to appear as we move from an industrialised economy to one founded on connections.

Businesses used to be able. to a very large degree to control the nature and flow of information, through marketing and PR, and because most people were connected only locally,

That no longer holds true. Everybody is connected. The business or organisation can longer mediate those connections – whatever frantic efforts lawyers make,

Listening to the slightly comical conversation on Radio 4 this morning regarding footballers having to clear their tweets through PR, it struck me just how much in denial many organisations are.

Our organisations are the people in them. As individuals, we are responsible for what we say and do,and the quality of organisations is a function of who they choose, and who chooses them.

Culture is different to marketing. It cannot be shaped, or controlled by budget. Jim Rohn said that we become the average of those we associate with.

That is now true of organisations. It makes a huge difference.

Where are you working this morning?

If your’e in an open plan office, then this video may well resonate.

There is a huge shift underway not only in how we work, but how we learn, how we relate and how we collaborate.

Although it may not feel like it sometimes, there is a huge power shift underway. We all have unique abilities, worldviews and talents; and an ability to use them to live that matters – to us, and others. Resumes are history. Attitudes, dispositions and networks of purpose are the new currency of careers.

Who you are matters. For most of us, to borrow from Schumpeter, the organisation we work for is crumbling beneath the assumptions it’s built on.